Category Archives: On the scene

VIFF 2010: recap

We may have missed the last week of the Vancouver International Film Festival (those hotel bills add up!), but I’d say we got what we came for. Poutine nights, Japadog breaks, dim sum discoveries, Granville Street fadeouts. Did we mention … Continue reading

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VIFF 2010 (day 6): Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives

For many cineastes, a new Apichatpong Weerasethakul is nothing short of a spiritual awakening. That is, if you can actually manage to stay awake. Like many of his like-minded contemporaries — Tsai Ming-liang immediately comes to mind — Weerasethakul’s pacing … Continue reading

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VIFF 2010: Dragons & Tigers Young Cinema Award — odds and ends

Breaking news (7:20pm): Upset! Hirohara Satoru’s Good Morning to the World! is winner of the Young Cinema Award. Phan Dang Di’s Don’t Be Afraid Bi! and Xu Ruotao’s Rumination given special mentions. The winner at this year’s new Asian cinema … Continue reading

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VIFF 2010 (day 6): Sawako Decides, Insects in the Backyard, Kimu the Strange Dance, End of Animal

Today was another beautiful day in Vancouver. The sun was out and the air was crisp. As one local put it, it’s been a remarkable October weather-wise, with sun triumphing over rain. It’s too bad then that I spent another … Continue reading

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VIFF 2010 (day 5): I Wish I Knew, The Fourth Portrait, Hahaha, Single Man

Editors’ note: It was just one of those days at VIFF 2010, where the poutines were fresh, and all the films were tiger-good to dragon-great. So much so, in fact, that they deserve pullquotable blurbs that even Peter Travers would … Continue reading

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VIFF 2010 (day 4): Poetry, Thomas Mao

Subjectivity is the name of the game in Zhu Wen’s Thomas Mao and Lee Chang-dong’s Poetry, but Zhu and Lee use very different lenses to describe their worldview. For Zhu, the lines between artist and subject, time and space are … Continue reading

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